Gorbold Behavioral Consulting, Inc.

The tutoring process at GBC aba takes place in 5 steps: intake, assessment, customizing the program, starting the program, and ensuring long-term maintenance, retention, and moving-on.

1. Intake Meeting

During the intake meeting, you and your learner will meet with the tutoring staff at GBC aba that will be working with your child. We will collect background information, homework samples, and notes from the learner’s teachers to ensure that our programs are a good fit for your learner’s needs.


2. Assessment Process
The assessment is done one-on-one with the learner. Our highly trained tutors use well researched, cutting edge assessment tools to help determine what skills should be taught first in the program.

3. Tailoring Customized Program for the Learner
The tutoring team will develop a customized program for your learner using scientifically-engineered curricula. These individualized programs will target building the component skills that will help the learner succeed when presented with the larger, composite tasks.

4. Starting the Program
A highly trained tutor will work one-on-one with your child to complete homework and teach the component skills that will help your learner succeed in their academic setting. Our tutors monitor progress every step of the way, and make immediate adjustments based on the learner’s performance to ensure success. When a learner becomes proficient in a certain skill, we move on to teaching new skills.

5. Ensuring Maintenance, Retention, and Moving-On to New Skills
Throughout the process, we make sure the learner hasn’t lost a skill by frequently practicing the skill, and running maintenance and retention checks. We re-teach skills if necessary, with the goal that the learner will remember these skills in the future.

Programs We Use

At GBC aba, our tutoring team will collaborate with the student’s teachers and other professionals to identify the academic needs of each learner. During each tutoring session, highly trained tutors will guide the learner as he or she completes their homework. The tutoring team will also identify the gaps in the component areas that relate to the learner’s current academic curriculum. The tutors will use well-researched and scientific curricula to customize programs that teach these skills the learner may be missing. This will help the learner go above and beyond with their current and future academic work!

We also use keep learning fun and motivating, and praise any amount of success. We use various techniques to avoid burn-out, such as changing up the way we deliver instructional material, providing breaks, and always providing praise! This should be an enjoyable process for the learner and everyone involved, and we go to great lengths to make sure this is the case.

Quality of our services and client satisfaction are extremely important to our team here at GBC aba, and we will always work to ensure that everyone is more than satisfied with our services and that the learner continues to grow with their academic success.

The tutors we employ are master’s level or above and are either Board Certified Behavior Analysts, or working toward their certification. Additionally, all tutors have passed thorough background checks.

Fluency

Fluency is a central concept to PT that has had a large impact on the success of education programs (Binder, 1996). Fluency is defined as “doing things so fast that they become second nature and are performed without effort, without error, without distraction, and can be performed for longer periods of time with great resistance to forgetting” (Lindsley, 1996, pp. 211-212). According to Binder and Watkins (1990), fluency-building instructional methods, like PT, have been scientifically shown to increase academic achievements and self-esteem when compared to the more traditional teaching techniques.

Fluency does not only increase how quickly a student demonstrates a skill, but research has also shown that individuals who are more fluent in a specific task tend to remember the material after long periods of time (Orgel, 1984), stay focused in distracting environments (Binder, Haughton, & Van Eyk, 1990; Cohen, Gentry, Hulten, & Martin, 1972), and can successfully apply what they have learned to new situations (Binder & Bloom, 1989; Haughton, 1972; Johnston & Layng, 1992, 1994).

Component and Composite Skills

Finally, component and composite skills also play a key role in PT programming. Component responses are the smaller, fine motor responses that make up the larger, more complex composite behavior. For example, when looking at math, long-division would be a composite skill that has addition, subtraction, and multiplication as its component skills. For example, knowing that 5 x 2 = 10 is a component skill for figuring out that 10/2 = 5. If the learner is not fluent in the multiplication fact, than he or she may be less likely to succeed when presented with the composite division problem. PT techniques focus on identifying component areas that the learner could strengthen, and then teaching these skills to a fluent level. Fluency of component skills makes it more likely that the learner will succeed with the composite skill. The faster a learner can correctly do a component response, the more successful he or she is likely to be with the composite skill (Haughton, 1972). For example, if a child can write that the product of 5 x 5 five is 10 (i.e., the composite skill) at a rate of 50 times per min, then he or she is likely to write that the quotient of 10/2 is 5 (i.e., the component skill) at a higher rate as well.

About Tutoring at GBC aba

GBC aba Provides:


  • Free Initial Consultations
  • Learner Centered Approaches
  • Flexible & Consistent Scheduling
  • In-Home: One-on-One Tutoring
  • Individualized Assessments
  • Learner Specific Academic Programming
  • Ongoing Progress Monitoring
  • Visual Supports
  • Collaboration with the Student's Teacher(s) and Interdisciplinary Team
  • ​Tutors who are Master's Level and/or Doctoral Students



Tutoring is appropriate for learners including but not limited to:


  • Students Performing Above Grade Level
  • Students Performing at Grade Level
  • Students Not Yet Performing at Grade Level



Fees


​If you have additional questions regarding our fees and billing procedures, please contact us.

info@gbcaba.com
+1.312.882.1024

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) uses evidence-based procedures and precision teaching for teaching academic skills. This extensive training in ABA and precision teaching (PT) sets GBC aba apart from other tutoring organizations.

PT techniques focus on the model that the learner knows best. That is, the curricula are adjusted for each individual learner to maximize success and learning. PT also focuses on recording the frequency (or, number of times something occurs) of a directly observable skill. (Behavior research company website). For example, for a student learning multiplication facts, a measure that the PT tutor may record could be the number of correct flashcards that the learner completed in one minute.

About Precision Teaching

helping transform lives

The Tutoring Process

Mathematics

  • Monitoring Basic Skills Progress (MBSP): Basic Math Computation, and Concepts & Applications
  • Morningside Mathematics Fluency: Addition & Subtraction, and Multiplication & Division


Reading

  • Qualitative Reading Inventory-4
  • Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons
  • Haughton Learning Center: Phonological Coding: Word & Syllable Awareness
  • Haughton Learning Center: Phonological Coding: Phonemic Awareness
  • Morningside Phonics Fluency

Fluency

Fluency is a central concept to PT that has had a large impact on the success of education programs (Binder, 1996). Fluency is defined as “doing things so fast that they become second nature and are performed without effort, without error, without distraction, and can be performed for longer periods of time with great resistance to forgetting” (Lindsley, 1996, pp. 211-212). According to Binder and Watkins (1990), fluency-building instructional methods, like PT, have been scientifically shown to increase academic achievements and self-esteem when compared to the more traditional teaching techniques.

Fluency does not only increase how quickly a student demonstrates a skill, but research has also shown that individuals who are more fluent in a specific task tend to remember the material after long periods of time (Orgel, 1984), stay focused in distracting environments (Binder, Haughton, & Van Eyk, 1990; Cohen, Gentry, Hulten, & Martin, 1972), and can successfully apply what they have learned to new situations (Binder & Bloom, 1989; Haughton, 1972; Johnston & Layng, 1992, 1994).

Component and Composite Skills

Finally, component and composite skills also play a key role in PT programming. Component responses are the smaller, fine motor responses that make up the larger, more complex composite behavior. For example, when looking at math, long-division would be a composite skill that has addition, subtraction, and multiplication as its component skills. For example, knowing that 5 x 2 = 10 is a component skill for figuring out that 10/2 = 5. If the learner is not fluent in the multiplication fact, than he or she may be less likely to succeed when presented with the composite division problem. PT techniques focus on identifying component areas that the learner could strengthen, and then teaching these skills to a fluent level. Fluency of component skills makes it more likely that the learner will succeed with the composite skill. The faster a learner can correctly do a component response, the more successful he or she is likely to be with the composite skill (Haughton, 1972). For example, if a child can write that the product of 5 x 5 five is 10 (i.e., the composite skill) at a rate of 50 times per min, then he or she is likely to write that the quotient of 10/2 is 5 (i.e., the component skill) at a higher rate as well.